Double Yolks and Wind Eggs

Among these four chicken eggs are three yolks. Can you guess how many each contains?

Double-yolk eggs are said to occur once in about 1,000 eggs laid. I’ve found many of these elongated monstrosities over many years of collecting eggs, and there remains a certain excitement to discovering one, from spotting the enormous shell to making bets on its contents to cracking it open and winning double gold.

Consumers of store-bought eggs miss out on this pleasure, because in the United States commercial eggs are sorted by weight and large anomalies discarded. Even normal-sized eggs with two yolks, which do occur, are culled after “candling,” a process of shining a light though the egg to examine its yolk and look for any undesirable matter. One producer in Pennsylvania is cashing in on two-yolk-inclined chickens, selling them by the dozen.

These were our first-ever wind eggs, though, laid two days in a row undoubtedly by the same pullet. Wind eggs are yolkless oddities resulting from a reproductive glitch, as are the double-yolkers. They’re also called cock eggs, dwarf eggs, and least charmingly, fart eggs.

Both extra-large and extra-small have histories of lore surrounding them, understandably. Unlike other errors of egg formation, wind eggs and double-yolks feel delightfully lucky.


2 thoughts on “Double Yolks and Wind Eggs

  1. Hi Kelly! Just found your blog via Pinterest and glad I have. 🙂

    I’ve always thought double yolkers to be lucky – appalled to learn they are thrown out by mass market sellers. People are missing out on lovely surprises at breakfast time 😉

    Love from England,

    Alena x


    • Thanks Alena! I know– an awful lot of great “ugly” produce and other products are lost this way. I hope and suspect that trend will change as we work harder to provide food for people (which really means less waste rather than greater production, in my opinion.) So glad you found me! Love back at you from across the pond. ❤


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